Prague Saints s. r. o.

Polska 32, Vinohrady
120 00 Prague 2

Payment Options 

Partners

Connect with us

  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon

Featured in

© 2018 by Prague Saints. Proudly created with Wix.com.

INTRODUCTION

Prague's dreaming spires, stunning architecture and energetic nightlife have attracted millions of tourists and made the city one of the most popular destinations in Europe. It is sometimes difficult to believe that it is only 27 years ago that the Czechs rose up and overthrew their Communist government. Now the country is a member of NATO and the European Union and its capital is enjoying an economic boom.

The 40 years of communism had rendered the city a black and white version of its former self but the huge renovation and reconstruction program following the 1989 revolution is almost finished and the city has now recovered phoenix-like to its former beauty and glory.

Prague remains as beautiful as ever. It has one of the best preserved and most beautiful medieval towns in Europe, partly due to the fact that it was almost untouched during the Second World War, which so ravaged other historic towns in the region.  The castle which looms above the city, is more than 1100 years old and is the largest historic castle in the world.

Many visitors come to the city just to enjoy its varied and vibrant nightlife. Traditional bars and restaurants sit side by side with more modern places, offering  gourmet cuisine, fabulous drinks and great coffee. Overall however nothing can beat a delicious cold Czech beer in one of the city's many traditional Czech pubs.

The country has much more to offer besides its stunning capital. A trip to one of the spa resorts such as Karlovy Vary in north Bohemia, one of its famous castles or to one of the lovely towns of South Moravia like Cesky Krumlov is highly recommended.

There are low-cost carriers traveling to Prague from various parts of Europe at very affordable prices. Take advantage of them and we guarantee that you will not be disappointed by what this fabulous city has to offer.

COSTS AND MONEY

By Western standards the Czech Republic remains a fairly cheap country. Locally produced food and drink (especially beer) are very good value. Some tourist-orientated restaurants and bars have sharply increased their prices in the last couple of years but they still remain reasonable when compared to those in more Western capitals. The one aspect of a visit that can be considered expensive is accommodation. Hotels in the centre, especially in high season, often charge well over 100 euros per night.
 

Despite its membership of the EU, the Czechs have not yet joined the Euro and it is unclear when they will do so. The currency is the crown which hovers around 28 to the pound, 25 to the euro and 23 to the US dollar although please note that these rates change regularly. There are exchange offices all around the city but the rates they offer are often poor value and we would advise that you use instead the numerous cash machines in the city. If you do need to use an exchange office we would recommend 'Exchange' at Kaprova 13, very close to the Staromestska metro station. Click here to see their current rates. It is possible to use euros in more touristic places although you will often be charged for the privilege with some non-preferential rates.

 
 

CZECH BEER AND PUBS

The Czech Republic brews some of the best light beers in the world and its various pubs and bars are skilled in knowing how to look after and present them. Some of its brands such as Pilsner Urquell, Budveiser Budvar and Staropramen are well known on the world market but beer lovers should also try some of the others, particularly Gambrinus, Radegast and Krusovice, which are very popular in Prague, but also beers from smaller breweries such as the tasty Bernard and Velkopovicky Kozel.

On entering a Czech pub you should first take a seat (it is very unusual to stand) and wait for the waiter to approach you. He will then give you a small paper tab on which he will collate the number of beers you have drunk as you progress through the evening. When you wish to stop drinking simply wave your paper tab at the waiter. When paying simply round up the amount to include the tip. 5 to 10 percent is normally acceptable.  

Visiting Czech pubs is of course a good way to meet the locals who will invariably speak a few words of English. Czechs are very fond of toasting. It is important when doing so however always to look them very quickly in the eye when toasting. To not acknowledge the toast in this way makes you look insincere or dishonest in Czech eyes. Also never ever pour the remains of an old beer glass into the new one; this is considered very bad form.  

 

GETTING THERE/GETTING AROUND

Getting there 

It is possible to fly from just about every large country in Europe to Prague. In addition a large number of budget airlines are operating from smaller airports.

 

The following airlines fly to Prague from the UK at present:

EasyJet, a budget airline, have a comprehensive flight schedule to the city, flying daily from London Stansted, twice daily from Gatwick, daily (except Tuesdays) from Manchester and 4 times a week from Bristol and Edinburgh airports.

 

British Airways also fly from a number of UK airports to Prague. Their prices are slightly higher but they are worth checking for special offers

 

Ryan Air fly regularly from Liverpool and London Stansted airports. 

 

Smart Wings also fly from London Gatwick.  

 

Wizz Air fly regularly from London Luton.

 

Czech airlines fly regularly from London Gatwick, Birmingham and Liverpool. 

From the USA:

 

Delta fly direct from JFK in New York.

Getting Around 

The best way to see Prague is on foot but the city also has a fabulously efficient transport system, with trams and the three-branch metro dominating in the city centre and buses prevalent on the outskirts. You can buy tickets for the metro and tram in trafika kiosks and also in machines in the metro stations. 

A  24 crown ticket permits travel for 30 minutes on trams and buses or 5 stops on the metro (including one transfer) and is good for quick hops. A  32 crown ticket is valid for 90 minutes on any form of transport. Simply validate these in the small yellow machines when entering a tram or walking into the metro system. 24 hour, 3 day and 5 day tickets are also available for those planning to use the transport system more frequently. 

It is also now possible to buy the 24 crown ticket using your mobile phone but only with a Czech sim card. Simply send the text message 'DPT' to the number 902 06 and you will receive confirmation of purchase by reply text within one minute.

 

Taxis are not especially expensive (except from the airport and railway station) but are prone to overcharging of foreigners. Try to avoid flagging them down in touristy parts of the city and stick to reputable companies like AAA (telephone 14014) and City Taxi (257 257 257).

 

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

The Czech Republic

Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic, a country of 10.5 million people that formed the western half of Czechoslovakia. It gained its independence following the 'Velvet Divorce' with Slovakia on January 1st 1993. The official language of the country is Czech.  

 
Embassies, visas and documentation 

European Union, US and New Zealand nationals do not require a visa to enter the Czech Republic. The British Embassy is on the small Thunovska Street (number 14) in Mala Strana. You will realise you are there when you see the bust of Churchill on the corner. The US embassy is around the corner on Trziste 15. 

According to the law, everyone should carry an identifying document (such as a passport or driving license). You will only rarely be asked to produce this but we would suggest that you carry a photocopy.

 
Telecommunications

The International Dialling code for the Czech Republic is +420. All Prague numbers (mobile/cell phones excepted) begin with a 2.

In an emergency you should dial 112. For more specific emergencies you can call 158 (police), 155 (ambulance) and 150 (fire).     

 
Crime and Safety

Compared with most Western cities Prague is a relatively safe place to visit. Most people, even single women, feel comfortable walking around the streets at night. The most common form of crime for tourists is pickpocketing. Please be careful when travelling on trams or metros or when walking in crowded tourists areas.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

The Czech Republic

Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic, a country of 10.5 million people that formed the western half of Czechoslovakia. It gained its independence following the 'Velvet Divorce' with Slovakia on January 1st 1993. The official language of the country is Czech.  

 
Embassies, visas and documentation 

European Union, US and New Zealand nationals do not require a visa to enter the Czech Republic. The British Embassy is on the small Thunovska Street (number 14) in Mala Strana. You will realise you are there when you see the bust of Churchill on the corner. The US embassy is around the corner on Trziste 15. 

According to the law, everyone should carry an identifying document (such as a passport or driving license). You will only rarely be asked to produce this but we would suggest that you carry a photocopy.

 
Telecommunications

The International Dialling code for the Czech Republic is +420. All Prague numbers (mobile/cell phones excepted) begin with a 2.

In an emergency you should dial 112. For more specific emergencies you can call 158 (police), 155 (ambulance) and 150 (fire).     

 
Crime and Safety

Compared with most Western cities Prague is a relatively safe place to visit. Most people, even single women, feel comfortable walking around the streets at night. The most common form of crime for tourists is pickpocketing. Please be careful when travelling on trams or metros or when walking in crowded tourists areas.

 

FIVE STRAIGHT BARS NOT TO MISS

You may not believe it but there is more to Prague's nightlife than the Prague Gay Scene. And despite what you might have read it does not just consist of badly-behaved stag and hen parties from the UK. Prague simply abounds in bars, cafes and clubs in every shape and size and to suit every age, taste and budget. From a delicious cheap beer in a traditional Czech pub to the fanciest mixed drinks in the ritziest bars, Prague has something for everyone.  Here is a list of our 10 favourite straight bars and pubs.

1. BLACK ANGELS

This highly original ### bar has the perfect location right on Old Town Square in the building housing the U Prince hotel and restaurant.  But it is far from being your typical tourist hangout.  A receptionist on the door will guide you into the cave-like series of rooms containing two bars and a number of small cosy, eclectically-designed spaces each decorated with the ever present black angel motif.  This is not a regular bar: photographs are not allowed to 'preserve the privacy of the customers' and you would be hard pushed to know what to expect when choosing from the creatively-written drinks menu.  But rest assured each ### is lovingly prepared by the talented bartenders who are happy to chat with you all about mixology.  This place is strongly recommended although drinks are not cheap by Czech standards, running to around 200 crowns each.

Staromestske Namesti 29, Prague 1

2.  TRETTERS BAR

Owned and managed by the eponymous Michal Tretter, this American-style bar has been a stalwart on the scene for more than 15 years.  We would recommend taking a seat at the bar where you can watch the bartenders in action.  On quieter nights they are charming and happy to chat to you about their drinks.  The quality is very good for the price. Can get very busy on weekend nights.

V Kolkovne, Prague 1

3. GIN AND TONIC CLUB

There is no secret to what this club specialises in: gin, gin, tonic and yet more gin.  We have truly never seen so many gins collected in any one place, hailing from all around the world.  They serve a large number of gin and tonic combinations each lovingly prepared by very friendly bartenders.  There is a very pleasant terrace outside in summer and also a restaurant.   

Navratilova 11, Prague 1

4.  BEER GARDEN AT RIEGROVY SADY

Almost anyone living in the gay friendly neighbourhood of Vinohrady will tell you that, on a warm summer's day, their favourite place to drink a beer is this beer garden.  Riegrovy Sady is a large hilly park overlooking the city and is hugely popular with locals who gather on its grassy slopes and take in the views.  The beer garden sits in the middle of it all - if you are not sure where to find it, just follow the noise.  As well as cold cheap beer you can also purchase such Czech food staples as sausage and fried and pickled cheeses.  If the beer garden is too busy and noisy for you (and on football and ice hockey days it can get very busy) you can also try the nearby Mlekarna which offers a more sedate experience.

 

5. ZUM ZUM CAFE

What the Gin and Tonic Club does for gin, this Cuban-style establishment does for rum.  There are literally hundreds of different rums to be found on their various shelves and cabinets, from all over the world and in every price range.  The bar looks a little unprepossessing from the outside, but once inside the wood panelled room will transport you to old world Havana.  Service can be a little slow - there is usually only one person working and some bottles can be difficult to find - but it is worth the wait 

Zitna 42, Prague 2

 

TEN THINGS NOT TO MISS

1. A walk across the Charles Bridge (Karluv most)

We would suggest either early in the morning or late at night when the crowds are much reduced. The cobbled bridge, lined with statues of the saints, links the Old Town to the Little Quarter (Mala Strana), the city's second medieval town.

 

2. Get lost in the labyrinthine streets of the Old Town (Stare Mesto)

This maze of cobbled streets, countless old churches and courtyards was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992. Finish your tour with a drink in one of the pubs or cafes on Staromestske namesti (Old Town Square).

 

3. Prague Castle

This 9th century castle is said to be the largest in the world and dominates the city. Particularly impressive lit up at night when it casts a warm glow over the Little Quarter and Old Town. You will need to spend at least half a day here, and must not miss the brilliantly quaint Golden Lane (Zlata ulicka) within its walls.

 

4. Visit a traditional Czech pub

Prague still abounds in these wonderful establishments where you can tuck into meat and dumplings and drink the cheap and tasty Pilsner beer. The Czechs drink more beer than any other nation and after a visit to one of these places you will soon know why.

 
5. Hike to the top of the Petrin Tower

This 19th century copy of the Eiffel Tower affords some of the best views of the city and is one of the few places where you can look down on Prague Castle. Take the funicular from the bottom of Petrin Park to get there. For those with energy a short hike across the top of the park from the tower to Strahov Monastery is also highly recommended. The Monastery contains an old library which could have been created from the imagination of JK Rowling.

 

6. The Wallenstein garden

This fabulous Mala Strana garden is home to peacocks, huge goldfish, carpets of beautiful tulips and some of the weirdest sculpture you are likely to see in this city.

 

7. The Fred and Ginger Building

Named like this because it appears to be dancing around its corner site. To be found down the river next to Jiraskuv bridge.

 
8. Visit an art gallery

The city galleries contain a number of masterpieces including works by Rubens, El Greco and Durer. The National Gallery on Veletrzni in particular should not be missed.

 
9. Go shopping in the Old Town

Bohemian crystal remains a good value, high quality purchase and there are plenty of shops in the Old Town ready to show you their wares. Also good value are wooden toys in a number of craft shops around town.

 

10. Drink a coffee in the venerated Café Slavia

This café has been the favoured haunt of writers, artists and dissidents since the days of the Czechoslovak independence. The café at the Obecni dum (Municipal House) near the Powder Tower is a good substitute.

 

WHEN TO VISIT

It is possible to visit Prague at any time of the year although the weather is often the most pleasant from April to June and September to October. It can get very hot in the summer. If you can bear the freezing temperatures, January and February are particularly inviting, as the streets are quiet and peaceful and you sometimes have the tourist sights to yourself. Prague is particularly attractive when covered in a blanket of snow.

 

RESTAURANTS

Prague abounds in literally hundreds of restaurants, varying hugely in style, cost and the types of cuisine on offer. As a general rule you should try to avoid places in the very touristy spots as these tend to be overpriced with the accompanying increase in quality.  If you can try to eat more locally, Vinohrady in particular has many good restaurants, at much better prices than those in Prague 1.  Here we have selected just a few of our very favourite restaurants.

Almost all Czech restaurants have a 'denni nabidka' or 'daily menu' available at lunchtime with cut price dishes from around 100 crowns, sometimes including soup or a drink, ready to be served immediately.  These are usually a real bargain, although as soon as the item sells out, that's it, you have to choose something else.  Some restaurants have only a daily menu at lunchtime.

 
Prague Saints